Housing in Hawaii – What’s Holding It Up!

Jay Fidel and Duke Oishi highlight a conference put on by Think Tech, Hawaii Venture Capital Association and Pacific New Media covering housing in Hawaii.

A range of topics concerning housing were discussed by the members of the conference, who include Christine Camp of Avalon Hawaii, David Callies of the UH Law School, Robert Harris of the Sierra Club, Lee Sichter of Belts Collins Hawaii, Jun Yang of Faith Action for Community Equity, Panos Prevedouros from the UH School of Engineering, Senator Donovan Dela Cruz the Chair of the Seante Housing Committee, Ben Kudo of Imanaka, Kudo & Fujimoto, Gil Barden of Pacific Island Investments, Jon Wallenstrom of Forest City Hawaii, Ann Bouslog of Mikiko Corporation, Peter Savio of Hawaiian Island Homes, Paul Quintilani of Kamehameha Schools, Cheryl Soon of SSFM International, Marc Alexander the Covernor’s Homelessness Coordinator, Micah Kane of Kamehameha Schools, Billy Kenoi the Big Island Mayor, Emilia Noordhoek from Sustainable Molokai and Harry Saunders of Castle & Cooke. Also includes a Spensation from Bill Spencer about the program on Reciprocal China Investment.

May 2016 Events

Ta'u Pupu'a Benefit ConcertCome see internationally acclaimed operatic tenor TA’U PUPU’A and friends in concert on May 21! Presented by Kilohana UMC and Kilohana Angels, this benefit concert is to raise money for Kilohana UMC’s music ministry and Kilohana Angels’ home health care training and certification.

Tickets: $30
Time: Saturday, May 21, 7:00 pm
Location: McKinley Auditorium – 1039 S King Street
Email: tauconcert@gmail.com
Phone: 808-372-3372

April 2016 Events

2016.04.05 Faith and Labor flyerFaith & Labor

Faith leaders: check out our Faith & Labor Forum Thursday, 4/14 from 11:30a – 1:00p at The Cathedral of St. Andrew, Honolulu. Help us lead the faith community for a better Hawai’i. Lunch will be provided; RSVP at aikeahawaii@gmail.com.

Working people–our congregations, our neighbors, our families–are working harder to make ends meet. The cost of housing and basic necessities are rising. Good, local jobs are under threat. Reverend Scott Marks, a New Haven pastor, will talk about how he’s organizing his community to fight for good jobs.

Scott Marks was born in North Carolina to a Pastor mother and Deacon father. Lured by the promise of good jobs, his family relocated to New Haven where Scott completed his education. After finding religion in 1985, Scott went on to preach the gospel; he continues to pastor at New Growth Outreach ministries. Long compelled to use his strong voice for those who feel they don’t have one, Pastor Marks stepped up to represent his community in city hall as Alderman of Ward 21. As a co-founder of Connecticut Center for a New Economy (CCNE) and New Haven Rising, Scott organized and trained people from all walks of life, races, genders, and religions to fight to protect their homes, jobs, and communities. He organized marches and rallies, made alliances with local and national leaders, and continuously advocated on behalf of communities ravaged by poverty, violence, and inequality -and for working people everywhere. Recognizing Rev Marks’ solid leadership, UNITE HERE recruited him to serve as President of Local 226-2. The union sent him to organize in some of the country’s most difficult areas. In Las Vegas, Chicago, Washington, DC and Memphis he fought for working people to have a voice and be treated with respect. Pastor Marks rejoined the CCNE staff in 2011. He lives in New Haven with his wife Jill and their six children.

HousingHousing Now Rally Now Rally

Rally for affordable housing! Please join various churches, unions, concerned citizens, and those struggling to find decent & affordable housing as we rally at the State Capitol.

Thursday, April 21, 3pm-6pm at the Hawaii State Capital
Contact Catherine Graham — catgraham48@gmail.com — for more information.

February 2016 Events

JOIN THE RALLY – Access to Higher Education for All

Wednesday, February 24, 2016, at 3:00 pm
Fronting Hawai’i State Capitol on Beretania Street

  • Pass HB1613 and HB 1513
  • Fight for your future
  • Education is a right
  • Not a debt sentence

TOWN HALL MEETING: How much is our care worth?

Monday, February 29
Registration at 5:30pm / Program at 6pm
Sacred Hearts Academy
3235 Waialae Ave, Honolulu, 96816

Join elected officials, advocates, and experts for a town hall meeting about SB 2478 and HB 1885 — our plan to ensure everyone in Hawai’i can care for our kupuna.

care4kupuna.com

For more information, contact Dawn:
dmoraiswebster@gmail.com
808-383-7581

Town Hall Meeting Feb 29thFree Community College Rally

Hawaii Needs Long-Term Plan for Long-Term Care

Hawaii Needs Long-Term Plan for Long-Term Care

By the Rev. Samuel L. Domingo – Posted January 20, 2016, in Star Advertiser

Caring for our community means something different in Hawaii than it does anywhere else in the country.

We know the value of family and community, and the important role our elders play in both.

Leviticus 19:32 tells us: “Rise in the presence of the aged and honor the elderly face-to-face!” There is a moral imperative in taking care of our elders, and God expects us to do that.

When given the choice, 90 percent of people over age 65 prefer the notion of staying home to receive care rather than moving to a facility.

Family members are often incredible caregivers, but providing that care creates financial and emotional stress. Supporting home caregiving means Hawaii can honor the wishes of our seniors, as well as help caregiving families who work so hard to keep their loved ones at home safely.

Every eight seconds, someone in the country turns 65 years old. As U.S. demographics shift, Hawaii’s population is aging even more rapidly, and living longer than mainland counterparts.

According to the February 2014 “State of Hawai‘i Healthcare Innovation Plan,” the number of residents over age 60 has increased 300 percent since statehood. As the demographic makeup of our state changes, we need to change the way we provide care for older residents. We need a long-term plan for long-term care.

In 2016, Hawaii’s legislators will have a chance to create a new piece of care infrastructure for our state: access to a certain amount of resources each day for a year to assist in paying for in-home care through the creation of a long-term care benefits trust fund.

This fund isn’t meant to cover a stay in a long-term care facility like a nursing home or assisted living. It’s meant to help family caregivers give their loved ones successful long-term care at home, by helping them to hire companion care or invest in equipment like walkers and ramps.

In my church, many find themselves caring for loved ones at home, and paying for that out of their own pockets. Senate Bill 727 would ensure a long-term care benefit of $70 per day for 365 days and establish a “care floor,” ensuring that everyone could access basic resources to provide care at home.

As a state, we need to pull together to address that cost, so that all of us can help our elders enjoy their senior years at home with their families.

Our church has a very active ministry for the elderly. Members who are part of the Alzheimer’s group or the Senior Day Care Program know how important it is to be able to keep their family members at home. I am one of them: my in-laws live with my family; my father-in-law is in hospice care, and we had to bring help into our home to assist in his care. We know the enormous amount of work it takes to keep our loved ones at home with us, as well as the cost; $70 a day for a year would go very far in helping us and many other caregiving families manage those costs.

Hawaii’s leadership on this issue is tied directly to our cultural understandings of the role of elders in our communities and the importance of shared responsibility; it is our kuleana.

Hawaii has the incredible opportunity to be the national leader on innovative public policy to provide assistance to family caregivers. Our policy makers need to recognize their kuleana to help everyone take better care of their loved ones by passing this bill.

Caring for our elderly is a privilege. There is no more important social issue than for us to champion care for our elders. We should embrace every opportunity to support efforts to help caregiving families. As the old saying goes, “A burden shared is a burden halved.”

PICO Training and Aston Waikiki Action

FACE Hawaii — with members from both Oahu and Maui — had a wonderful two-day training this past weekend on community organizing offered by the People Improving Communities through Organizing (“PICO”) National Network. The training was focused on recognizing the roles of privilege and power, creating trust between the members our organization, the importance of sharing our stories and turning those stories into action. This training was put to work on Friday night when we joined UNITE HERE! Local 5 in a prayer vigil for Aston Waikiki hotel workers fighting for dignity on the job.

Friday night’s action included a peaceful protest in the lobby and on the front steps of the Aston Waikiki Beach Hotel, where workers are saying they have been harassed and discriminated against for organizing to create a union, and are protesting labor practices and low wages.

Related news coverage from earlier this year about the workers:http://www.bizjournals.com/…/workers-at-aston-hotels-in-wai…

 

 

Housing Now Hawaii Action

Did you know that Hawai’i has one of the highest rates of homelessness throughout the United States?

Did you know that the average cost to rent a 2 bedroom apartment in Honolulu is $1,810 – which means you would need to make $31/hr to afford that rent?

When: Tuesday, August 4th, 2016 from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM

Location: Honolulu Hale

As we urge State, and City leaders to take action and address this long-standing need to create permanent, affordable housing units.
Our schedule of events are as follows:
10 AM – Prayer Circle
10:15 AM – 12 PM: Art/Sign Making Tent
11:30 AM – 1 PM: Guest Speakers
(Councilwoman Kymberly Pine, Councilman Brandon Elefante, Rev. David Gierlach, Rev. Walter Brownridge, Gary Hoosier, Eric Gill, Senator Suzanne Chun Oakland, Jenny Lee)
12 PM – Lunch will be provided by The Virgil Brothers and Sage of Ohana Family of the Living God
 
1:30 PM Deliver letters to Council Members, Mayor, Governor, and Legislators (meet in front of Honolulu Hale)
There will be continuous sign waving throughout the day, with free lunch and drinks provided.  If you are interested in attending, and/or would like more information, please contact Catherine Graham or Rev. Bob Nakata by clicking on their names.

We are looking forwarding to seeing all of you there!

Ige Signs Bill to Help Undocumented Immigrants Obtain Driver’s Licenses

The Hawaii law is effective January 1, 2016.

·By ANITA HOFSCHNEIDER

Hawaii Gov. David Ige has signed a bill into law that creates a limited purpose driver’s license for people who don’t have documents to prove they are legally allowed to live in the U.S.

The governor signed the measure, House Bill 1007, on Tuesday, according to a press release.

The measure was backed by the Hawaii Coalition for Immigration Reform and Filipino community advocacy groups such as the Filipino American Citizens League. But in addition to immigrants, the law applies to a range of drivers including homeless people and domestic violence victims who may not have the proper documentation.

The law becomes effective January 1, 2016.

Courtesy of Gov. David Ige

Ige-Immigrant

Gov. Ige poses with advocates for a new limited purpose drivers license on June 30.

http://www.civilbeat.com/2015/06/ige-signs-bill-to-help-undocumented-immigrants-obtain-drivers-licenses/