Kupuna Caregivers Interview

SB534 aims to give family caregivers some respite from their unpaid labor of love, looking after seniors at home. For some, that has meant giving up paid professional work or cutting back on hours. There are financial, emotional and physical costs to the caregiving that is now largely borne, unheralded and unpaid. Pedro Haro and Kathy Jaycox share their work on this bill for caregiver compensation.

Pedro Haro is the Hawaii Community Organizer for Caring Across Generations, a national movement of families, caregivers, people with disabilities and aging Americans working to transform the way we care for this country. He is putting together the rally organized by Care For Our Kupuna, on Feb 7 at 10 a.m. at the Rotunda to urge legislators to do something this session to address the challenge presented by our demographics.

Kathy Jaycox, a Kailua resident since 1992, developed many coalitions across institutional boundaries. This has included partnering the UH Community Colleges with the Hawaii Department of Education to implement Running Start, which allows high school students to enroll in college courses and earn dual credit.

Kathy also considers herself the “birth mother” of the Hawaii P-20 Partnerships for Education, an alliance of pre-K, K-12, and higher education.

In retirement, she continues to be an organizational bridge builder. As the Oahu president of FACE, Faith Action for Community Equity, she works with a coalition of 23 organizations — most of them faith-based — to address issues of social justice.

Housing in Hawaii – What’s Holding It Up!

Jay Fidel and Duke Oishi highlight a conference put on by Think Tech, Hawaii Venture Capital Association and Pacific New Media covering housing in Hawaii.

A range of topics concerning housing were discussed by the members of the conference, who include Christine Camp of Avalon Hawaii, David Callies of the UH Law School, Robert Harris of the Sierra Club, Lee Sichter of Belts Collins Hawaii, Jun Yang of Faith Action for Community Equity, Panos Prevedouros from the UH School of Engineering, Senator Donovan Dela Cruz the Chair of the Seante Housing Committee, Ben Kudo of Imanaka, Kudo & Fujimoto, Gil Barden of Pacific Island Investments, Jon Wallenstrom of Forest City Hawaii, Ann Bouslog of Mikiko Corporation, Peter Savio of Hawaiian Island Homes, Paul Quintilani of Kamehameha Schools, Cheryl Soon of SSFM International, Marc Alexander the Covernor’s Homelessness Coordinator, Micah Kane of Kamehameha Schools, Billy Kenoi the Big Island Mayor, Emilia Noordhoek from Sustainable Molokai and Harry Saunders of Castle & Cooke. Also includes a Spensation from Bill Spencer about the program on Reciprocal China Investment.

Ige Signs Bill to Help Undocumented Immigrants Obtain Driver’s Licenses

The Hawaii law is effective January 1, 2016.

·By ANITA HOFSCHNEIDER

Hawaii Gov. David Ige has signed a bill into law that creates a limited purpose driver’s license for people who don’t have documents to prove they are legally allowed to live in the U.S.

The governor signed the measure, House Bill 1007, on Tuesday, according to a press release.

The measure was backed by the Hawaii Coalition for Immigration Reform and Filipino community advocacy groups such as the Filipino American Citizens League. But in addition to immigrants, the law applies to a range of drivers including homeless people and domestic violence victims who may not have the proper documentation.

The law becomes effective January 1, 2016.

Courtesy of Gov. David Ige

Ige-Immigrant

Gov. Ige poses with advocates for a new limited purpose drivers license on June 30.

http://www.civilbeat.com/2015/06/ige-signs-bill-to-help-undocumented-immigrants-obtain-drivers-licenses/

Hawaii DOT Settles Driver’s License Exam Lawsuit

Discrimination against foreign-born residents was alleged when translation of some exams was discontinued.

·By CHAD BLAIR

The Hawaii Department of Transportation and the nonprofit Faith Action for Community Equity (FACE) said Friday that a lawsuit was settled regarding the translation of driver’s examinations for vehicle licenses.

United States District Court Judge Susan Oki Mollway approved the settlement.

In 2013, FACE said it was concerned that speakers of Marshallese, Chuukese and Ilocano were being disenfranchised because exams were not available in those languages.

Faith Action for Community Equity

Marshallese and Chuukese

Marshallese and Chuukese making their case to the Maui DOT in April 2013.

Translations of the driver’s test began in 2001, but they were later suspended after new state laws led to changes in the test. The DOT did, however, provide translations into eight other languages including Japanese and Tagalog.

FACE filed a lawsuit in federal court alleging that the DOT discriminated against foreign-born residents of Hawaii “by not offering a translated exam for a period of more than five years after previously existing translations were removed from service when additional questions needed to be added to the exam,” according to a joint press release.

For its part, the DOT says it consistently disputed that there was “any discriminatory motive” involved in decision-making about the translated exams. In a statement, DOT Director Ford Fuchigami said his department is committed “to serving all of Hawaii’s residents regardless of who they are or where they are from.”

The DOT currently offers the examination in 13 languages, said to make Hawaii the only state under 2 million people to offer the exam in more than 10 languages, including Hawaiian.

FACE said it is pleased with the outcome of the case.

http://www.civilbeat.com/2015/05/hawaii-dot-settles-drivers-exam-lawsuit/

Affordable housing summit draws hundreds to State Capitol

By Ben Gutierrez

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) –There’s been a lot of attention given to new condominium construction in areas like Kakaako, but how many people can actually afford some of those units? That was a question tackled by a summit on affordable housing at the State Capitol.”There’s a lot of discussion about the high-end housing we see going up in the urban core,” said Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell. ” and people are wondering, ‘Hey, what about housing for the rest of us?'”Many of those people showed up at Saturday’s summit organized by Faith Action for Community Equity, also known as FACE.

There was some discussion about the homeless, with one possible solution coming in the form of renovated container units, turned into housing.

“We need to take away the stigma of homeless housing away from the subject,” said Craig Chapman of Lanihuli Community Development Corporation, which has been building the container homes. “What we’re really trying to look at now is how can we get the working poor families get back into their community.”

But it’s not just the working poor or homeless. It includes the middle class as well, according to organizers.

“Your nurses, your firemen, your policemen, people you don’t necessarily consider ‘needy’ that actually struggle with affordable housing,” said James Fitzpatrick of Hawaii Health Connector and a community organizer with FACE.

Right now, 30 percent of new housing projects must be affordable for people making 140 percent of the area’s median income, or about $134,000 for a family of four. According to the Honolulu Board of Realtors, the median sales price for a single-family home in Honolulu last month was $690,000.

Building housing that’s more affordable will be a challenge for a variety of reasons, including community opposition.

“When you try to build an affordable housing project in a community, you oftentimes run into NIMBY’s who don’t want you to build it there for many different reasons,” said John White of Pacific Resource Partnership.

But the discussion has begun, and organizers are hopeful.

“People have been talking about this for a very long time,” said Fitzpatrick. “So the step after talking — we need to have actions and decisions.”

View videos and more photos over on the HawaiiNewsNow page: http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/27395936/affordable-housing-summit-draws-hundreds-to-state-capitol

Campaign Corner: No on Ballot Measure 4

In 2012, FACE’s Education Team fought to protect junior kindergarten, giving the state time to come up with a better plan for our keiki.  In September 2014, FACE hosted Dr. Cliff Tanabe of the UH Education Department, Joan Husted former HSTA Exec Director and members of Parents for Public Schools to debate the value of “Question 4”, the constitutional amendment that would allow public funds to be spent on private early childhood education programs.

At the end of the session, the group voted to recommend a “no” vote on the amendment. FACE leader Mary Weir explains her reservations about Amendment #4 in her October 28 Op Ed in Civil Beat.


FACE Meets with Gubernatorial Candidate – Neil Abercrombie

FACE Meets with Neil Abercrombie from on Vimeo.

FACE (Faith Action for Community Equity) hosted a meeting on October 15, 2010 with gubernatorial candidate and former Representative Neil Abercrombie to discuss the issue of faith in public life with an audience of clergy. Mr. Abercrombie addressed certain criticisms that have been leveled at him and other candidates for office, critiquing whether they have the right credentials of faith and religion to be in a leadership position in government.

In Neil Abercrombie’s response, you will find a depth of thinking and reflection that I find rare as a public official.  After all, how many politicians do you know who study and quote such lights as Thomas Merton, the Dalai Lama, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Mahatma Gandhi, Paul Tillich, or Rheinhold Neibhur?

(Note: This video is unedited. The breaks in the video come from the camera cutting off after 5 minutes or so – a limitation in writing .avi files on Nikon equipment.)

Island Connections – FACE: Faith and Politics

Host: Ibrahim Aoude – Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa

Guests:
– Gerry Madison – Chair, Jobs Committee, Faith Action for Community Equity (FACE)
– Godfrey Maeshiro – Vice-President, Local 5 and Labor Committee, FACE
– Michelle Takemoto – Jobs Committee, FACE

Summary:
The relationship between faith and social activism for justice and equality is highlighted. FACE and its activism in the community, including community organizing, is highlighted. The importance of activism on all levels to effect social change comes into sharp focus.