Caring Across Generations!

child_grandmaThursday, April 30
6:00 to 9:00 p.m. in Davies Hall at St. Andrews Cathedral

Talk story with Ai-Jen Poo

Help us build Hawaii’s movement for care and caregiving! This event is a conversation about the challenge of caregiving in our state. National leader Ai-Jen Poo will read from her recent book The Age of Dignity, as well as lead a discussion about how our families are planning for aging and long term care.

Join the event on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/1041074595920387/

Learn more about Caring Across Generations: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3F8isOxNGM

AiJen Poo is the founder of the National Domestic Worker Alliance and the author of The Age of Dignity. She is the co-chair of the Caring Across Generations.

 

FACE Interfaith Service on Long Term Care — Transcript

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27 October 2014, 6-7:30 p.m.
St. Elizabeth Episcopal Church; Honolulu, Hawaii
By: Dr. Clementina D. Ceria-Ulep

Good evening ladies and gentlemen, honored guests:

My name is Clementina Ceria-Ulep, a parishioner of Our Lady
of the Mount (OLM) Catholic Church in Kalihi Valley, and laity vice-president
of Faith Action for Community Equity (FACE) and an
associate professor and chair of the Department of Nursing at the
University of Hawaii School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene. It is an
honor and a privilege to be here with you this evening to talk about an
issue that is very dear to me and a concern to us all—long-term care.
Before I proceed, let me define the word “long term care.” Long-term
care is the umbrella term for the various supportive services used by
persons who need assistance to function in their daily lives. Long
term care services include nursing, home health, and personal care;
rehabilitation, adult day care, case management, social services,
assistive technology and living services. My interest on this issue
stems from my experiences while growing up and during my practice
as a nurse.

 

Long-term care is the umbrella term for the various supportive services used by
persons who need assistance to function in their daily lives.

 

My family was fortunate to immigrate to Hawaii from the
Philippines through the kindness of uncle Lawrence, a plantation
worker in the early 1900’s. In the Philippines, my family and I lived
first with my paternal and then later with my maternal grandparents.
My paternal grandfather then in his 90’s, helped my father in the farm
while the rest of my grandparents supervised the home–cooking,
cleaning, caring, and disciplining of the grandchildren. I remember
that our grandparents ruled their homes and were revered by their
children and grandchildren. To this day as my family and friends will
tell you, I am quite fanatic about keeping the house clean, a legacy
from my grandmothers.
Growing up, my first exposure to the issue of long-term care
was through my parish’s involvement in providing volunteer care for
the residents of Beverly Manor, a nursing home near Kalihi Valley
Homes. Once a week, our youth group–Junior Filipino Catholic Club,
visited and worked with the residents on arts and crafts projects. I
recall spending five years as a volunteer at Beverly Manor, where
loneliness seemed to be the order of the day. Over time, I got used
to the atmosphere. Then one day, I invited a high school friend to
accompany me on a visit to Beverly Manor. On our ride back home, 3
my friend cried all the way. She sobbed, “That’s so sad…I would
never put my grandparents or parents in a care home!” How many of
you, during your first visit to a nursing home, made the same
promise—not to put your parents in such a “horrible” place, but ended
up doing so because you simply could not help it?
While studying in Virginia, I befriended Helen who lived alone
and was in her early 90’s. She used to treat some students and I to a
musical play. One day, she broke one of her hips and became
dependent on others. Every day, I would visit and administer her
vitamin B injection. When she moved to a care home, she had to sell
all her prized possessions and used her lifetime savings to pay for
nursing home.

…she had to sell all her prized possessions and used her lifetime savings to pay for her nursing home.

 

Kilohana Angels Home Care Cooperative

Kilohana Angels Home Care Cooperative held a huge community Kilohana Angelscelebration and fundraiser in September. Kilohana Angles is the only worker-owned cooperative on Oahu.

Kilohana Angels began as a vision and ministry of Kilohana United Methodist Church to provide training and job opportunities for an unskilled minority population of women to meet an identified need in the community.

For more information about Kilohana Angels Home Care Cooperative, contact Rev. Alan Mark or Tiala Toe’tu’u at (808) 722-4188.

 

 

“Proverbs From Our Families” Interfaith Service Draws Crowd To Contemplate Our Kupuna’s Needs For Long Term Care

Monday evening, October 27, members of 19 FACE congregations came together for an evening of shared stories of the wisdom and faith we have learned from our kupuna.

Methodist, Episcopal, Catholic, Evangelical, and UCC clergy led a powerful interfaith service weaving their own stories and those of their congregations together for a deeper understanding of our islands’ need for more affordable long term care for our elders.

Mahalo to the choirs and musicians!

This interfaith service was part of FACE’s Caring Across Generations Campaign. For more information, call Patrick Zukemura at 391-3464.

“Proverbs From Our Families” Story Collection Will Lead To Interfaith Service

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Last year’s Oahu talk story meetings raised up the issue of long term care and aging. FACE voted to take on this issue this fall and into 2015. First we are grounding ourselves and our activism in our own real life family stories by lifting up the role that elders play in our own lives. We will collect these stories throughout the fall in our churches via post card and long forms for an inreach we are calling “Proverbs From Our Families”.

These stories will lead to an interfaith service on Monday October 20th focused on the value of elders in our lives. While this is happening we are in the process of preparing and introducing a new long term care bill into the state legislature.

FACE has worked on long term care several times in our nearly 20 year history, but a solution to this problem has always eluded us. We are lot stronger and more sophisticated now than we were the last two times we tried this and we are hopeful that this time we can make it work!

For more information on FACE’s “Proverbs From Our Families” story collection or to get story collections guides and postcards for your church, temple, synagogue or organization, please contact FACE Organizer Leotele Renee Togafau at 808-429-8337 or email at leotele.face @gmailcom.