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Searching for Our New Executive Director!

We are now accepting applications for the position of Executive Director of FACE Hawaii (FACE Maui and FACE Oahu). We are making a nationwide search, so please inform your leaders and constituents and ask them to help spread the position availability.

The job description, requirements and application process may be found online at www.organizingcareers.org.

For more information regarding the Executive Director’s position, please address your questions to Karen Ginoza, Chair FACE Transition Team, at (808)227-7804 or ginozakh@yahoo.com.

Qualifications (partial list, visit www.organizingcareers.org for full details)

  • An unwavering passion for and commitment to social justice and the communities that FACE/Hawaii serves.
  • Minimum of 5 years organizing experience in rural and urban (medium-to-large) communities.
  • At least 3 years of congregation/faith-based organizing experience, effective implementation of local and federated campaign strategies and campaign victories.
  • Commitment to eliminate racial disparities that persist throughout our society.  We are convinced that the progress on our specific policy goals and the larger task of developing a new multi-racial coalition for social justice requires that we move toward, not away from a frank reckoning with racial privilege as well as other kinds of privilege (gender, economic, etc.)
  • Knowledge of the legislative process at all levels of government (county, state & national levels).
  • Proven track record of successful grant writing, and management of grants and funders.
  • Ability to work with and mobilize volunteers in great numbers.

Wahiawa Health Center to Open!

After years of working toward providing the Wahiawa community has access to affordable, high quality health care, the Wahiawa Center for Community Health (Wahiawa Health) is ready to open to the public!

FACE has supported this project through the years, and we are encourage our members to attend the celebration and blessing on Saturday, August 13. The event will include food, activities and entertainment.

Date: August 13 2016

Location: 302 California Avenue parking lot (Wahiawa Medical Building/Medical Arts Clinic)

Time: 12pm (blessing) – 3pm

http://www.wahiawahealth.org/

 

May Events

Ta'u Pupu'a Benefit ConcertCome see internationally acclaimed operatic tenor TA’U PUPU’A and friends in concert on May 21! Presented by Kilohana UMC and Kilohana Angels, this benefit concert is to raise money for Kilohana UMC’s music ministry and Kilohana Angels’ home health care training and certification.

Tickets: $30
Time: Saturday, May 21, 7pm
Location: McKinley Auditorium – 1039 S King Street
Email: tauconcert@gmail.com
Phone: 808-372-3372
Buy online: www.kilohanaumc.org/benefit-concert.html

April Events

2016.04.05 Faith and Labor flyerFaith & Labor

Faith leaders: check out our Faith & Labor Forum Thursday, 4/14 from 11:30a – 1:00p at The Cathedral of St. Andrew, Honolulu. Help us lead the faith community for a better Hawai’i. Lunch will be provided; RSVP at aikeahawaii@gmail.com.

Working people–our congregations, our neighbors, our families–are working harder to make ends meet. The cost of housing and basic necessities are rising. Good, local jobs are under threat. Reverend Scott Marks, a New Haven pastor, will talk about how he’s organizing his community to fight for good jobs.

Scott Marks was born in North Carolina to a Pastor mother and Deacon father. Lured by the promise of good jobs, his family relocated to New Haven where Scott completed his education. After finding religion in 1985, Scott went on to preach gospel; he continues to pastor at New Growth Outreach ministries. Long compelled to use his strong voice for those who feel they don’t have one, Pastor Marks stepped up to represent his community in city hall as Alderman of Ward 21. As a co-founder of Connecticut Center for a New Economy (CCNE) and New Haven Rising, Scott organized and trained people from all walks of life, races, genders and religions to fight to protect their homes, jobs and communities. He organized marches and rallies, made alliances with local and national leaders, and continuously advocated on behalf of communities ravaged by poverty, violence, and inequality -and for working people everywhere. Recognizing Rev Marks’ solid leadership, UNITE HERE recruited him to serve as President of Local 226-2. The union sent him to organize in some of the country’s most difficult areas. In Las Vegas, Chicago, Washington, DC and Memphis he fought for working people to have a voice and be treated with respect. Pastor Marks rejoined the CCNE staff in 2011. He lives in New Haven with his wife Jill and their six children.

HousingHousing Now Rally Now Rally

Rally for affordable housing! Please join various churches, unions, concerned citizens, and those struggling to find decent & affordable housing as we rally at the State Capitol.

Thursday, April 21, 3pm-6pm at the Hawaii State Capital
Contact Catherine Graham — dreamaloha@hawaii.rr.com — for more information.

Upcoming Events in February

JOIN THE RALLY: access to higher education for all

Wednesday, February 24
3pm
Hawai’i State Capitol

Pass HB1613 and HB 1513
Fight for your future
Education is a right
Not a debt sentence

TOWN HALL MEETING: How much is our care worth?

Monday, February 29
Registration at 5:30pm / Program at 6pm
Sacred Hearts Academy
3235 Waialae Ave, Honolulu, 96816

Join elected officials, advocates, and experts for a town hall meeting about SB 2478 and HB 1885 — our plan to ensure everyone in Hawai’i can care for our kupuna.

care4kupuna.com

For more information, contact Dawn:
dmoraiswebster @ gmail.com
808-383-7581

Town Hall Meeting Feb 29thFree Community College Rally

Payday Loans

We are conducting a survey on payday lending in the state of Hawai'i. Payday lenders (payday loans) are small, short term loans that require borrowers to pay loans back in full by their next payday.
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Hawaii needs long-term plan for long-term care

By the Rev. Samuel L. Domingo

Posted January 20, 2016 in Star Advertiser

 

Caring for our community means something different in Hawaii than it does anywhere else in the country.

We know the value of family and community, and the important role our elders play in both.

Leviticus 19:32 tells us: “Rise in the presence of the aged and honor the elderly face-to-face!” There is a moral imperative in taking care of our elders, and God expects us to do that.

When given the choice, 90 percent of people over age 65 prefer the notion of staying home to receive care rather than moving to a facility.

Family members are often incredible caregivers, but providing that care creates financial and emotional stress. Supporting home caregiving means Hawaii can honor the wishes of our seniors, as well as help caregiving families who work so hard to keep their loved ones at home safely.

Every eight seconds, someone in the country turns 65 years old. As U.S. demographics shift, Hawaii’s population is aging even more rapidly, and living longer than mainland counterparts.

According to the February 2014 “State of Hawai‘i Healthcare Innovation Plan,” the number of residents over age 60 has increased 300 percent since statehood. As the demographic makeup of our state changes, we need to change the way we provide care for older residents. We need a long-term plan for long-term care.

In 2016, Hawaii’s legislators will have a chance to create a new piece of care infrastructure for our state: access to a certain amount of resources each day for a year to assist in paying for in-home care through the creation of a long-term care benefits trust fund.

This fund isn’t meant to cover a stay in a long-term care facility like a nursing home or assisted living. It’s meant to help family caregivers give their loved ones successful long-term care at home, by helping them to hire companion care or invest in equipment like walkers and ramps.

In my church, many find themselves caring for loved ones at home, and paying for that out of their own pockets. Senate Bill 727 would ensure a long-term care benefit of $70 per day for 365 days and establish a “care floor,” ensuring that everyone could access basic resources to provide care at home.

As a state, we need to pull together to address that cost, so that all of us can help our elders enjoy their senior years at home with their families.

Our church has a very active ministry for the elderly. Members who are part of the Alzheimer’s group or the Senior Day Care Program know how important it is to be able to keep their family members at home. I am one of them: my in-laws live with my family; my father-in-law is in hospice care, and we had to bring help into our home to assist in his care. We know the enormous amount of work it takes to keep our loved ones at home with us, as well as the cost; $70 a day for a year would go very far in helping us and many other caregiving families manage those costs.

Hawaii’s leadership on this issue is tied directly to our cultural understandings of the role of elders in our communities and the importance of shared responsibility; it is our kuleana.

Hawaii has the incredible opportunity to be the national leader on innovative public policy to provide assistance to family caregivers. Our policy makers need to recognize their kuleana to help everyone take better care of their loved ones by passing this bill.

Caring for our elderly is a privilege. There is no more important social issue than for us to champion care for our elders. We should embrace every opportunity to support efforts to help caregiving families. As the old saying goes, “A burden shared is a burden halved.”

PICO Training and Aston Waikiki Action

FACE Hawaii — with members from both Oahu and Maui — had a wonderful two day training this past weekend on community organizing offered by the PICO (People Improving Communities through Organizing) National Network. The training was focused on recognizing the roles of privilege and power, creating trust between the members our organization, the importance of sharing our stories, and turning those stories into action. This training was put to work on Friday night, when we joined UNITE HERE! Local 5 in a prayer vigil for ‪#‎Aston‬ Waikiki hotel workers fighting for dignity on the job.

Friday night’s action included a peaceful protest in the lobby and on the front steps of the Aston Waikiki Beach Hotel, where workers are saying they have been harassed and discriminated against for organizing to create a union, and are protesting labor practices and low wages.

Related news coverage from earlier this year about the workers:http://www.bizjournals.com/…/workers-at-aston-hotels-in-wai…

 

 

HOUSING NOW Action on August 4

Did you know that Hawai’i has one of the highest rates of homelessness throughout the United States?
 
Did you know that the average cost to rent a 2 bedroom apartment in Honolulu is $1,810 – which means you would need to make $31/hr to afford that rent?
 
Join us on
Tuesday, August 4th
at
Honolulu Hale
from
10AM – 3PM
 
As we urge State, and City leaders to take action and address this long standing need to create permanent, affordable housing units.
Our schedule of events are as follows:
10AM – Prayer Circle
10:15AM – 12PM: Art/Sign Making Tent
11:30AM – 1PM: Guest Speakers
(Councilwoman Kymberly Pine, Councilman Brandon Elefante, Rev. David Gierlach, Rev. Walter Brownridge, Gary Hoosier, Eric Gill, Senator Suzanne Chun Oakland, Jenny Lee)
12PM – Lunch will be provided by Brother(s) Virgil and Sage of Ohana Family of the Living God
 
1:30 PM Deliver letters to Council Members, Mayor, Governor and Legislators (meet in front of Honolulu Hale)
There will be continuous sign waving throughout the day, with free lunch and drinks provided.  If you are interested in attending, and/or would like more information, please contact: Catherine Graham (catgraham48@gmail.com), or Rev. Bob Nakata (bobnakata239@aol.com).
We look forward to seeing you on Tuesday, August 4th!